Thursday, 18 December 2014

I found it very sad that so many residents were buried in unmarked graves.

 St Michael, Forden, Powys
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Unusually the bell tower is sited at the side of the church rather than at the end.
 
 
The Forden Union workhouse later became Brynhyfryd Hospital and provided care mainly for the elderly. I found it very sad that so many residents were buried in unmarked graves. 
 
Visited - May 2013

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An unusual grave reporting the birth and death of adult twins.

 Market Harborough, Leicestershire
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We found it rather curious that this major cemetery
didn't have a notice board at the entrance.
 
 
 An unusual grave reporting the birth and death of adult twins. 
 
Visited - July 2009

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A slate tomb showing pre-deceased children

St Torney, North Hill, Cornwall 
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We arrived at the church just as a service was ending. We were pleased to see that the churchyard had been well maintained.
 
 
 At the west end of north aisle there is the slate table tomb of Thomas Vincent of Battens (died 1606) and Jane his wife (died 1601) flanked by their 7 daughters and 8 sons. The small skulls above the heads of some of the children show they pre-deceased their parents.
 
 
 Visited - June 2014

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Friday, 12 December 2014

The grave of a murderer.

 St Andrew, Presteigne, Powys, Wales
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This church incorporates some elements of its late-Saxon predecessor on this site. The present building can be traced back to early Norman times, and was extended to its current length in the late 12th century, when a self-standing tower was erected. Another enlargement followed in the 14th century, adding the existing nave and a south aisle which connected the tower to the rest of the building.
 
 
Mary Morgan was a young servant convicted and hanged for killing her newborn child. On 13 April Morgan was hanged, and was buried in what was then unconsecrated ground near the church later that same afternoon. Her public execution attracted large crowds, who watched as she was taken by cart from the gaol to the execution at Gallows Lane. 
 
 
 
Visited - June 2014

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Wednesday, 10 December 2014

I have included both sides of this unique design.

 Kingsthorpe Cemetery, Northampton
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One strange feature of this cemetery is the high percentage of
gravestones lacking some of the key details.
 
 
 I have included both sides of the gravestone.
 
 
 Visited - December 2008

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John Wall was beatified by Pius XI and canonised by Paul VI.

 St Mary, Harvington, Worcestershire
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Curiously authorities differ as to exactly when John Wall and other English martyrs were beatified by Pius XI and canonised by Paul VI.
 


  
Visited - March 2011

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Tuesday, 9 December 2014

It is those Roman numerals again!

 St Aelhaiarn, Guilsfield, Powys, Wales
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The site of St. Aelhaiarn’s Church appears to be of early medieval origin, and is believed to have been founded by St. Aelhaiarn in the sixth century. Much of the visible church standing on the site today dates to the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, but the core is of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Thorough restoration work was carried out by G.E. Street in 1877-9, in which many of the original features of the building were swept away, but the church does nonetheless retain some early points of interest, most particularly the octagonal twelfth century font with four large masks.
 
 
 The arrangement of the text has been far made more complex than it need have been. It is those Roman numerals again!   
 
Visited - September 2014

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